Portfolio
FCC-Pavilion1
PAVILION AT THE CHILDREN'S CAMPUS
Creative site planning was required in order to successfully nest this large, 48-bed special needs residential facility into the center of an historic urban campus in Mishawaka, Indiana.The demolition of two existing, but functionally obsolete, structures proved to be the key. The overall composition was also enhanced by the development of a “split level” building design, which was able to capitalize upon the site topography, as well as a quadrangle approach to sidewalk connections.
  • FCC-Pavilion1
    THE PAVILION AT THE CHILDREN'S CAMPUS
    Creative site planning was required in order to successfully nest this large, 48-bed special needs residential facility into the center of an historic urban campus in Mishawaka, Indiana.The demolition of two existing, but functionally obsolete, structures proved to be the key. The overall composition was also enhanced by the development of a “split level” building design, which was able to capitalize upon the site topography, as well as a quadrangle approach to sidewalk connections.
  • FCC-Pavilion-Rear
    THE PAVILION AT THE CHILDREN'S CAMPUS
    Creative site planning was required in order to successfully nest this large, 48-bed special needs residential facility into the center of an historic urban campus in Mishawaka, Indiana.The demolition of two existing, but functionally obsolete, structures proved to be the key. The overall composition was also enhanced by the development of a “split level” building design, which was able to capitalize upon the site topography, as well as a quadrangle approach to sidewalk connections.
  • FCC-Pavilion2r
    THE PAVILION AT THE CHILDREN'S CAMPUS
    Creative site planning was required in order to successfully nest this large, 48-bed special needs residential facility into the center of an historic urban campus in Mishawaka, Indiana.The demolition of two existing, but functionally obsolete, structures proved to be the key. The overall composition was also enhanced by the development of a “split level” building design, which was able to capitalize upon the site topography, as well as a quadrangle approach to sidewalk connections.